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Are Surge Protectors Necessary For Tvs

author
Earl Hamilton
• Monday, 04 January, 2021
• 14 min read

SurgeProtectors can be one of those over-looked items that we don’t always think of while purchasing our beautiful flat panel TV, that is until the sales associate ask… do you have a surge protector at home? A surge is an increase in the electrical charge in a power line, which in turn increases the current that flows to your wall outlets in your home.

surge protectors
(Source: wiki.ezvid.com)

Contents

But when they do happen, most surge protectors will not be able to handle the extreme voltages that lightning produces and will fail to protect your devices. The best way to protect your devices during a lightning storm is to unplug them from your wall outlet.

A power strip is a device that looks similar to a surge protector that contains a series of electrical outlets contained in an electrically shielded case that will allow you to plug in multiple devices at once. Here we will talk about two types of surge protection: The first type is a whole-house surge protection/suppressor” which is a piece of hardware that connects to your electrical system before the circuit breaker box within your home and will protect your entire house from power line surges.

This type of surge protector will give you better protection than a stand-alone surge protector that plugs into your wall outlet, simply due to the fact that all electrical points (outlets) are covered by this device. For this reason, it is a good idea to have individual surge protection devices in all points of your home with electronics and appliances that require protection against surges.

For more practical reasons, most of us will opt for an individual (stand-alone) surge protector device that plugs into your wall outlet. How well these devices work will depend on how great a power line surge they encounter and their build quality.

Small power line surges caused by appliances in our homes and power grid fluctuations should be no problem for these devices to handle. Throughout the years I have personally never encountered a damaging power surge on any of my devices I deem important (TV’s, audio/video equipment and computers).

surge protector zoom parts b1 rollover express
(Source: www.parts-express.com)

My sister lost a TV and a DVD player to a power surge caused by a severe thunder and lightning storm. My friend had a power line (grid) electrical surge that fried his brand-new plasma HDTV.

This non-for-profit organization does a safety test and certification for electronic devices. Look for a surge protector with a response time of less than one nanosecond (one billionth of a second).

In addition, be sure the protector has an indicator light (s) that shows it’s working properly. If the devices you are protecting have phone lines, Ethernet cable (for connection to a computer network) and coax cable (for satellite and cable TV), you want a surge protector that will allow for these types of connections to protect those devices.

Here are links to a few manufacturers that provide quality surge protectors available at Amazon. Conclusion All of our electronics and appliances in our homes are subject to power line surges.

When the voltage increases above the norm for at least 3 nanoseconds, it's called a surge. The surge protector has one job: detect excess voltage and divert the extra electricity into the grounding wire.

surge generator protectors shore electric lake interior manufacturers voltage
(Source: lake-shore-electric.com)

Most people think that the biggest culprit of electrical surging is lightning, but that's not wholly true. In fact, buying a surge protector to save your electronics from a thunderstorm may not work in your favor.

While good surge protectors can take on a surge caused by a distant thunderstorm, a near or direct hit from a lightning bolt will fry it. The primary culprits of electrical surges are devices that require lots of power to operate.

Depending on the wiring of your home, you may notice at times that your lights flicker when powerful devices turn on and off, such as your air conditioner. You don't need a surge protector for your desk lamp or your standing fan, but you do want a surge protector for expensive devices that have intricate microprocessors, like computers, televisions, stereo systems, and media centers.

On an offbeat note, surge protectors can be useful for reducing cable clutter and improving organization with your electronics. All the cables end up being directed to the same destination, making it much easier for you to handle them all neatly.

Surge protectors only have a limited lifespan depending on how hard they work. As for protection power, good surge protectors will come with a UL rating, a rating put out by the independent Underwriters Laboratories that test the safety of electronic devices.

surge protector tripp lite phone coax techhive protectors buying advice
(Source: www.techhive.com)

The clamping voltage is the measurement that prompts the surge protector to start redirecting the excess electricity away from the plugged-in devices. In other words, a surge protector with a lower clamping voltage will trigger earlier, thus protecting your devices quicker.

Any surge protector with a clamping voltage below 400 volts should be good enough for home use. The higher the joule rating, the more energy can be absorbed by the surge protector, so a higher joule rating will often indicate a longer lifespan for the product.

This reduces the time that your plugged-in devices are exposed to the surge, thus protecting them better. Ideally, you'll want a surge protector with a response time of 1 nanosecond or faster.

We covered your best options in our article on the best surge protectors for every use case, from the budget-minded spender to someone protecting an expensive home cinema. You'll want to use surge protectors for complex and valuable electronics, such as computers, appliances, and media centers.

Simon Matt (384 Articles Published) A Computer Science B.Sc. graduate with a deep passion for all things' security. With an incredible range of prices and features, not to mention a barrage of questionable marketing promises, it's hard to figure out what's worth the money, and what's nonsense.

surge electronics selective social protectors save articles
(Source: social.selective.com)

Typically, power strips are cheap, multi-outlet products that are merely an expansion of a wall outlet. These usually have a circuit breaker (on/off switch) of some sort, but most don't offer any real “protection” from electrical issues.

Some might have the barest level of protection, but they're all pretty much just like plugging into the wall direct. To get some answers, the Wire cutter did a massive test on surge protectors, essentially blowing them up to see how well they worked.

There are a number of products on the market that claim to “condition” the power from the wall, promising improved performance in your gear. All electronics have a power supply that takes the incoming wall current (120v in the US), filters it for noise, and converts it into whatever the device needs.

If you want total protection, consider that phone and cable lines can carry power spikes too. Many surge protectors come with USB connections, so you can charge your mobile devices without having to use a wall warts.

Eve Systems While not offering much protection, a portable power strip might prevent marital friction, and/or invoke bliss from travel companions. Most portable power strips add two to three additional outlets, plus offer direct USB charging (see number 8).

surge protector refrigerator appliance voltage watts 1800 brownout appliances refrigerators amazon
(Source: www.ebay.com)

If you know you've had a serious electrical event (like lighting blew out a transformer down the street), it's probably worth replacing your surge protector just in case. If you live in an area with lots of thunderstorms, your gear is probably more likely to experience power surges.

Even if you live in the desert, your A/C or refrigerator could kick power spikes back down the lines to your A/V gear. We don't currently have recommendations for specific surge protectors, but you can find plenty of options for as little as $20 or less at Amazon.

I have checked the power with a multi and its coming in about 253V in South East Victoria which I think is a tad high, so I am in the process of looking into... I have checked the power with a multi and its coming in about 253V in South East Victoria which I think is a tad high, so I am in the process of looking into...

Mainly due to the eight widely spaced power sockets and the two USB ports. This is being used in the bedroom BUT the damn thing has red LED rocker switches on every outlet and the room lights up like Luna Park.

Now I know what to do with my bedroom reading light to get rid of the red LED glow. This is being used in the bedroom BUT the damn thing has red LED rocker switches on every outlet and the room lights up like Luna Park.

cctv surge accessories protector un balun categories
(Source: www.camera.lk)

Depending on your negotiation skills. The prices are overblown at places like IN etc. All my protectors are Welkin, stay as far away as possible from Monster unless you want to spend $$$. The Dick smith surge board might be Ok. It's the price of the surge board versus the cost of the insurance excess.

The experience I had while working for Tech2home IN was a customer had an all of his equipment connected to a Monster surge board (yes I know they overpriced blah blah, Bekins do the same thing) and a lightning strike hit his antenna and blew up TV, the Monster warranty replaced everything for new that was connected to board even though it was only the TV that was damaged, this included Amp, DVD recorder and a PS3. Okras anyone ever had equipment blow up without a surge protector personally? Does anyone know of a good minimum 6 gang surge board that has good switches like clips switches (or the old Saybrook ones)? Every one I've seen have very clunky click switches which is a pita every day when you watch TV. I'm after a nice smooth flowing one.

Yes you will get it under home insurance (if you ticked the right boxes) but you will not get anything from the power companies as you are responsible for protecting own equipment i.e. you can get a surge protector installed in meter box to protect whole house. Yes you will get it under home insurance (if you ticked the right boxes) but you will not get anything from the power companies as you are responsible for protecting own equipment i.e. you can get a surge protector installed in meter box to protect whole house.

And I'm always hesitant with the no-name brands as its pointless having one for your good equipment, if the board is a cheap IMO. You need to contact your supply authority immediately to have the tapping changed on your transformer up the street.

Completely blew the digital circuits of my old Pioneer HT receiver (analogue still worked). Got a Welkin for the lounge (and a new receiver) and all has been good since. The old Saybrook was kept as a power board and relegated to the barroom.

(Source: www.electronics.bm)

Failed to protect anything once again with older TV and bar fridge both getting fried during a storm. IMHO it is worth the peace of mind getting a decent surge protector for HIFI/TV (and a UPS for each PC).

It's wet and dark here ATM so might do another test and see what it shows. Haven't been able to check the neighbors yet but will get a wriggle on with that. Old Saybrook surge protector board” prove to be totally useless when the power dropped out and came back again.

Your neighbor will most likely be on a different phase from the street to you, so any voltage comparisons between your house and his would be a waste of time. Another thing to think about, is that it's not just surges that do damage, it's brownouts (that probably are the culprit for most failures), i.e. when the voltage drops excessively e.g. to 180V.

A UPS would give you some protection against surges, as well as kick over when a brownout occurs. We have surge protectors on the power feeds to all our PCs and home theater gear, but that isn't always enough.

IMO don't worry about getting one that comes with “insurance” as these policies are very difficult to claim under. If you have a lot of brown outs in your area, then a UPS with surge protection may better suit you...

(Source: www.electronics.bm)

I'm just after the best quality board, that can protect my TV, consoles, modem etc, and possibly save me some $$ by helping with standby mode. TBH I did consider the Areas (found them the other day), but the little red light would p×ss me off.

If you can't afford to lightning arrestors, just go for surge diverted in the switchboard and surge protectors on each power circuit. So the sun is out ant the solar inverters are reading 260ish volts and the power points are recording 258-259 with the multi.

For anyone that is interested, go and find yourself a Welkin Pure AV® Home Theater Power Console. If you can find one secondhand AND with a receipt (very important) as this comes with a lifetime warranty and $1m+ coverage.

Otherwise, Install a Couple of dedicated circuits in your home theater and add surge protection in the mains meter box. For anyone that is interested, go and find yourself a Welkin Pure AV® Home Theater Power Console.

If someone could say my microwave blew but all my surge protected stuff didn't I might believe it but otherwise I think its just snake oil and the main board should trip. DO ensure your home contents insurance covers surges, lightning strikes etc.

(Source: www.electronics.bm)

I'm also on the Gold Coast, but I've had all my gear on a Welkin (the big aluminum one) for several years. If someone could say my microwave blew but all my surge protected stuff didn't I might believe it but otherwise I think its just snake oil and the main board should trip.

I had a lightning strike a couple of years ago, all my AV equipment was plugged into the surge protector except the Foxtel IQ HD (it had its own socket as I left it turned on 24/7 for recording, everything else was turned off via the master switch on the surge protector). Everything plugged into surge protector lived, Foxtel box died (luckily for me, they replaced it FOC).

Interestingly I originally bought it because every time the water tank pump turned on there was a noticeable buzz through the speakers. It's also reassuring to know that should anything be damaged in spite of being connected to the Welkin, that they will replace it, up to a value (from memory) of $250,000.

I have done some product training with Welkin and $5 from every board sold goes into an insurance fund for this reason. I simply stated that nobody at the time had said I bought a surge protector, and it worked....now they have.

I hope all my Welkin power boards are “snake Oil” if I get a surge I want my gear to blow up. Also, I believe you can't get a fully individually switched 8 outlet board without some kind of surge protection included (6 yeses but never seen 8).

iphone max case ghostek covert za
(Source: www.electronics.bm)

Potentially as long as your home insurance covers your gear it might actually be a good thing they occasionally get fried! Or just get a board with equipment protection and not have to pay any excess and potential increase in premiums next year.

Hi Robot, If you don't mind, seeing that you're using Welkin surge protectors, would like to ask for your opinion on these two boards. Another thing to think about, is that it's not just surges that do damage, it's brownouts (that probably are the culprit for most failures), i.e. when the voltage drops excessively e.g. to 180V.

Meh, just pull the plug on most of the State of Victoria and blame it on God....AKA a convenient bushfire in the Bella area. You need to contact your supply authority immediately to have the tapping changed on your transformer up the street.

TWO, the Ombudsman's office, is so “pro the industry” that an investigation is needed. I didn't get anything and I lost my TV, with home theater and Foxtel while there was a strike of lightning nearby and all the appliances fried.

Welkin's response was that the components were all intact and there would have been signs in the protector if there had been a surge. Of course that is only true if it had attempted to disconnect before the appliances blew the connection clear which it didn't.

surge device 20ka 220v protection 10ka 1p
(Source: www.ec21.com)

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