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Are The Wildlings Vikings

author
Carole Stephens
• Wednesday, 09 December, 2020
• 7 min read

They are considered savages by the rest of Westeros, due to their barbaric lifestyles and worship of the Old Gods of the Forest. Such factions include the raiders from the Frozen Shore, the woodsmen of the Haunted Forest, ice-river clans believed to be cannibals, and the people of Then.

(Source: www.youtube.com)

Contents

The people of Westeros believe that all Wild lings are savage and are the main reason as to the necessity of the wall and the Night's Watch. However, the Night’s Watch does not forget its origin and believes the Wild lings are the least threatening force to come from beyond the wall.

Apparently, depictions from the Viking age never showed it nor made mention of it and the only real helmet discovered was without horns. It is good to note that painters seem to have fabricated the trend during the 19th century, maybe inspired by descriptions of northern Europeans by ancient Greek and Roman chroniclers.

Between paddling boats and executing adversaries, Viking men probably smelled to high Valhalla, correct? Unearthing of Viking destinations have turned up tweezers, razors, brushes, and ear cleaners produced using creature bones and tusks.

The sodium nitrate found in pee would permit the material to seethe as opposed to consume, so Vikings could take fire with them in a hurry. In the Norse religion, fearless heroes entered merry and great domains after death, and it was believed that the vessels that served them well in life would help them arrive at their last objections.

Recognized marauders and conspicuous ladies were regularly let go in boats, encircled by weapons, significant merchandise and occasionally even forfeited slaves. Viking young ladies got hitched as youthful as 12 and needed to mind the family unit while their spouses cruised off on experiences.

(Source: www.youtube.com)

They additionally raised cows, goats, pigs, and sheep on their little homesteads, which ordinarily yielded barely enough food to help a family. Scandinavians created crude skis in any event 6,000 years prior, however old Russians may have designed them considerably before.

Indeed, they presumably didn’t call themselves Vikings : The term basically alluded to all Scandinavians who partook in abroad undertakings. And then there's an image as perplexing as it is disturbing, of a man with his face painted with Stars and Stripes, a horned helmet made of fur pelts on his head, his bare chest and arms displaying Norse-symbol tattoos.

Several outlets later identified the shirtless rioter as Jake Angel, an Arizonian who calls himself a “Q Shaman” and is a prominent voice in the QAnon conspiracy movement. His choice of dress, according to an interview with The Arizona Republic, is something of a calling card, a uniform he wears to “attract attention,” subsequently engaging people in his QAnon beliefs.

Photos of another man decked in a large pelt, a fox skin on his head, and fur cuffs on his wrists, have also surfaced, and he too carries a spear. The roots of this Viking cosplay, however, go deeper than just a couple of fools wanting to stand out from the sea of MAGA hats in a deranged play for attention.

Nearly 23 years ago, in 1998, the Southern Poverty Law Center identified a neo-Nazi interpretation of Odin ism, the pre-Christmas, Northern European and Germanic religion, that was spreading in the United States. “A neo-Pagan religion drawing on images of fiercely proud, boar-hunting Norsemen and their white-skinned Aryan womenfolk is increasingly taking root among Skinheads, neo-Nazis and other white supremacists across the nation,” they wrote.

vikings gone wild bits gaming
(Source: jlnelson73.wordpress.com)

In 2003, the comparative religion scholar Matthias Gar dell reported “that racist forms of neopaganism were already outpacing traditional monotheistic versions of white supremacy.” Think: the furs worn by Wild lings in Game of Thrones, the horned helmet donned by SpongeBob SquarePants on Leif Erikson day, as well as the tattoos in the show, Vikings, and its spinoff, Valhalla.

According to a Vox report on research conducted by Yale linguistics professor Roberta Frank, it was not the Vikings who had horned helmets, but medieval Germanic peoples. The myth of the Vikings horned helmets can be traced back to 19th-century costume designer Carl Emil Doppler, who blended the Norse and Germanic histories for Wagner's opera about Nordic people, Her Ring DES Nibelungen.

Despite this factual error, the myth is perpetuated in popular culture today, thanks to film and television representations and certain Minnesota sports franchises. Time Magazine last year published a call to reclaim the imagery of the Nordic people, and to separate fact from this fictitious vision of Vikings as a homogeneous, barbaric, and ultimately heroic group of seafarers.

And then there's an image as perplexing as it is disturbing, of a man with his face painted with Stars and Stripes, a horned helmet made of fur pelts on his head, his bare chest and arms displaying Norse-symbol tattoos. Several outlets later identified the shirtless rioter as Jake Angel, an Arizonian who calls himself a “Q Shaman” and is a prominent voice in the QAnon conspiracy movement.

His choice of dress, according to an interview with The Arizona Republic, is something of a calling card, a uniform he wears to “attract attention,” subsequently engaging people in his QAnon beliefs. The roots of this Viking cosplay, however, go deeper than just a couple of fools wanting to stand out from the sea of MAGA hats in a deranged play for attention.

(Source: www.youtube.com)

Nearly 23 years ago, in 1998, the Southern Poverty Law Center identified a neo-Nazi interpretation of Odin ism, the pre-Christmas, Northern European and Germanic religion, that was spreading in the United States. “A neo-Pagan religion drawing on images of fiercely proud, boar-hunting Norsemen and their white-skinned Aryan womenfolk is increasingly taking root among Skinheads, neo-Nazis and other white supremacists across the nation,” they wrote.

In 2003, the comparative religion scholar Matthias Gar dell reported “that racist forms of neopaganism were already outpacing traditional monotheistic versions of white supremacy.” Think: the furs worn by Wild lings in Game of Thrones, the horned helmet donned by SpongeBob SquarePants on Leif Erikson day, as well as the tattoos in the show, Vikings, and its spinoff, Valhalla.

According to a Vox report on research conducted by Yale linguistics professor Roberta Frank, it was not the Vikings who had horned helmets, but medieval Germanic peoples. The myth of the Vikings horned helmets can be traced back to 19th-century costume designer Carl Emil Doppler, who blended the Norse and Germanic histories for Wagner's opera about Nordic people, Her Ring DES Nibelungen.

Time Magazine last year published a call to reclaim the imagery of the Nordic people, and to separate fact from this fictitious vision of Vikings as a homogeneous, barbaric, and ultimately heroic group of seafarers. Writer Dorothy Kim notes that despite evidence that Vikings were actually multicultural, the focus on race was nonetheless woven into the narrative of the religion beginning with Romantic German nationalism of the 19th century.

She says that German scholars of the time “rewrote history, drawing on folklore such as that of Brothers Grimm, medieval epics and a dedication to racial white supremacy.” At the time A Storm of Swords ends, The Night swatch, Stands and his followers, and Dance and the Wild lings are all at the Wall.

(Source: pbswisconsin.org)

If Stands were to allow the wild lings to settle in the Gift, would it be in their nature to attack northern villages and towns for plunder? Raiding is definitely a part of willing culture, as it was for many in the real world -- the Norse who went a-viking every summer, the ancient Celtic cattle raiders, the Scots border ravers, etc.

Would the wild lings agree to leave the northern villages in peace if asked or would that also be considered “kneeling”? Raiding is part of their culture... on the other hand, they also value a man keeping to his sworn word.

We all know Reign could easily sit on the Iron Throne if he switched series. Viking warriors had no fear of death because they believed in Fate and Valhalla.

Oh well, we can always just kick back instead, toast some marshmallows in our Viking ship fire pit and dream of what might have been. Ian, Chris and I played a game of Regimental Fire and Fury this week.

The main reason for the game was to get my newly painted Yankee cavalry into action. One Brigade of Chris's Yankee infantry with guns following march onto the table.

gone wild behance archer
(Source: www.behance.net)

The cavalry make their way across the table with a degree of panache and decorum unknown to the grubby infantry. It could have gone either way on this part of the battlefield but lack of time available for the game meant that there no decisive outcome could be achieved.

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Sources
1 freekidsbooks.org - https://freekidsbooks.org/at-the-zoo-early-reader/
2 en.wikipedia.org - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Zoo_Story
3 www.dinkleboo.com - https://www.dinkleboo.com/us/visits-the-zoo-personalized-story-book.html
4 www.kirkusreviews.com - https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/kathleen-long-bostrom/view-zoo/
5 openlibrary.org - https://openlibrary.org/works/OL2460258W/The_American_dream_and_The_zoo_story