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Best Jay Z Songs

author
Maria Johnson
• Saturday, 28 November, 2020
• 8 min read

“Can't Knock the Hustle” is a bona fide hip-hop classic, not just because of Jay's smug rhyming but also because Mary J. Blige's cameo is purely magical. In which two of the greatest MCs team up to salute their hood and throw barbs at rivals.

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(Source: www.npr.org)

Contents

Ever the shrewd businessman, Jay capitalized on the song's popularity by naming his album Vol 2... Hard Knock Life. Jazz rides a jazzy Ski beat, while Mecca works an ear wormy hook.

(Trivia : “Feeling' It” was originally designed for Camp Lo's Gee chi Suede, flow, hook and all.) Back when Dirty South was but a blip on the rap radar, Jazz connected with UK on a blockbuster Timberland beat.

A gripping tale in which Jay admits hurting his loved ones for selfish reasons. This is the side of Jay that was tucked away for years, but he opened up a real scab and created a gem in the process.

This pure, uncut slice of street hop triggered the campaign for American Gangster. “Blue Magic” wound up in the Bonus Tracks section, but it still jams harder than most lead singles.

Give Jazz a hard body beat, and he'll reward you with quotable rhymes. The Na's sample on “Rap Game/Crack Game” would eventually overshadow JayZ's performance on the song, thanks to its role in that famous battle.

jay diddy app excellence working champion music
(Source: www.nme.com)

Venues basically pay Jay to show up and watch the crowd rap the entire song. He “went out” on a high note, but “the Michael Jordan of rap” would soon bounce back like round ball.

Jazz dotes on the Big Apple and ends up with his biggest smash yet. Word has it that “Can I Live” marked the last time Jazz put pen to pad.

Cool riding a militant Kanye West beat, Jazz. After two full verses of Mob Deep dishes, Jazz turns his attention to Na's for the next 32 bars.

With scholarly focus, Jazz dismantles Na's' earlier attacks on “Stigmatic” Freestyle while launching a few insults of his own. The road to “Dead Presidents II” was paved with trial and error; hopes and disappointment; toil and joy.

The first, slightly subpar version of the song, didn't make the final cut for Reasonable Doubt. To add to the uncertainty, Na's is said to have been booked for a cameo, but he never made it to the recording studio.

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(Source: www.nme.com)

In the end, Jazz only needed a mic and a Ski beat to make his greatest song ever. Throughout the classic track, he spells out his lofty goals while kicking some of the worst lines he's ever coined.

That sentiment, expressed on “Public Service Announcement” (as well as by Jay’s look for his MTV Unplugged performance, where the face on his Che T-shirt was literally covered by his ROC chain), can be taken a lot of ways. There’s the methodical craftsman and artist that’s seen the heaven and hell of the American Dream, who constructs technically air-tight raps stuffed with clever punchlines and astute social commentary that rarely places blame or settles for easy answers.

For many rap fans, there’s never been a world where Jazz was anything but a monolithic figure within hip-hop, whose image and ideals functioned as shorthand for the very genre itself. It’s a common assertion that JayZ’s lost a step in his later years, and it’s true that his latter-day solo efforts, such as “Magna Carta Holy Grail” and “Kingdom Come,” don’t quite live up to his classics.

But earlier this year, Nova dropped one of the most politically charged tracks of his career, a response to the deaths of Alton Sterling and Philander Castile at the hands of police, addressing the cycles of poverty and racial profiling that are endemic to the black community. He and L trade verses for nine minutes, delivering such a striking tag-team performance that when Jay listened back to the freestyle for “Stretch and Bobbitt: Radio that Changed Lives” documentary, even he couldn’t help but be impressed.

But he couldn’t help but go all out on Young Jeezy’s “Go Crazy,” riding Don Cannon’s impeccable soul loop to self-canonize, tracing his route from the trap to the top. The track was the first time Jay linked with his fellow New York rap veteran Pete Rock and while Kanye’s verse oscillates between goofy sex jokes and self-empowerment aphorisms, Jay treats Rock’s Curtis Mayfield flip with reverence, rapping about his childhood with a mix of nostalgia and regret.

rap hop drinking hip liquor songs ranker
(Source: www.ranker.com)

Everyone always remembers the pop smash “Izzy” and the acidic “Takeover,” but the album’s true apotheosis was “Heart of the City,” where Jay lays his case out plainly for why he’s the best around. Swizz Beat’s jarring keyboard arpeggios and blunt-force baseline helped the track feel like a nervy fight anthem, and as soon as you hear Dark Man X’s signature growl on the intro to this “Vol.

“Guess Who’s Back,” off Face’s late-period classic “The Fix,” is essentially that track’s inverse, in which those same key players celebrate the same streets they lamented on “This Can’t Be Life.” It’s a concept song that finds Beanie Nigel running a 1-900 advice line for, uh, hustlers, directing calls to Jay, Memphis Bleak and Freeway.

Jay rounds the song out by detailing the exasperating minutia and abject paranoia of a life dedicated to the streets, mapping out his escape from the game in the process. This has produced some great music, but none more classic than “Big Pippin’,” Jay’s unrepentant Lothario anthem featuring the Port Arthur, Texas, luminaries UK.

Jazz lured Rick Rubin, one of the genre’s original architects, back into the realm of rap production for a slamming beat that rivaled his work with LL Cool J or the Beastie Boys. That sentiment, expressed on “Public Service Announcement” (as well as by Jay’s look for his MTV Unplugged performance, where the face on his Che T-shirt was literally covered by his ROC chain), can be taken a lot of ways.

There’s the methodical craftsman and artist that’s seen the heaven and hell of the American Dream, who constructs technically air-tight raps stuffed with clever punchlines and astute social commentary that rarely places blame or settles for easy answers. Then there’s the ex-hustler, who courts pop stardom and isn’t above dropping a harassed verse for a check (listen to him kill space on “Get This Money” by rapping about a bunch of different cripple colored stuff, for example), because that Jazz is still doing whatever he can to keep the pedal to the metal and never go back to where he came from.

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(Source: pigeonsandplanes.com)

Jazz lured Rick Rubin, one of the genre’s original architects, back into the realm of rap production for a slamming beat that rivaled his work with LL Cool J or the Beastie Boys. This has produced some great music, but none more classic than “Big Pippin’,” Jay’s unrepentant Lothario anthem featuring the Port Arthur, Texas, luminaries UK.

Jay rounds the song out by detailing the exasperating minutia and abject paranoia of a life dedicated to the streets, mapping out his escape from the game in the process. Hell, he hijacked an entire song on Memphis Bleak’s 534 album to ostensibly explain why he’d made the choice, only to spend half the track brushing off his enemies and dropping warnings to any pretenders to his throne.

“Guess Who’s Back,” off Face’s late-period classic “The Fix,” is essentially that track’s inverse, in which those same key players celebrate the same streets they lamented on “This Can’t Be Life.” Swizz Beat’s jarring keyboard arpeggios and blunt-force baseline helped the track feel like a nervy fight anthem, and as soon as you hear Dark Man X’s signature growl on the intro to this Vol.

Jay renders the song’s title an ironic joke, as he holds the privilege of the white world in one hand while showing the poverty of the hood in the other, rapping, “You all must really be in heaven there, somebody tells God we got a couple questions here.” The track was the first time Jay linked with his fellow New York rap veteran Pete Rock and while Kanye’s verse oscillates between goofy sex jokes and self-empowerment aphorisms, Jay treats Rock’s Curtis Mayfield flip with reverence, rapping about his childhood with a mix of nostalgia and regret.

But he couldn’t help but go all out on Young Jeezy’s “Go Crazy,” riding Don Cannon’s impeccable soul loop to self-canonize, tracing his route from the trap to the top. He and L trade verses for nine minutes, delivering such a striking tag-team performance that when Jay listened back to the freestyle for “Stretch and Bobbitt: Radio that Changed Lives” documentary, even he couldn’t help but be impressed.

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(Source: www.capitalxtra.com)

It’s a common assertion that JayZ’s lost a step in his later years, and it’s true that his latter-day solo efforts, such as “Magna Carta Holy Grail” and “Kingdom Come,” don’t quite live up to his classics. But in 2016, Nova dropped one of the most politically charged tracks of his career, a response to the deaths of Alton Sterling and Philander Castile at the hands of police, addressing the cycles of poverty and racial profiling that are endemic to the Black community.

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Sources
1 irowiki.org - https://irowiki.org/wiki/High_Wizard
2 www.iruna-online.info - http://www.iruna-online.info/class/High_Wizard
3 1gamerdash.com - https://1gamerdash.com/high-wizard-guide-ragnarok-mobile/
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