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Best X-men Writers

author
Earl Hamilton
• Tuesday, 29 December, 2020
• 16 min read

Created in 1963 by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, the X-Men form the third point on the Marvel Universes holy trinity of superhero teams. Unlike the Avengers and The Fantastic Four, the X-Men were teenagers at first and despite saving the world countless times over, the fact that they were mutants made them outcasts, hated and feared by the very people they were sworn to protect.

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Contents

These days, its hard to imagine that the X-Men were ever unpopular, but in the beginning, the title was plagued by poor sales and was constantly under threat of cancellation. Outcasts from society, they provide a form of escapism that many people can relate to, particularly unpopular nerdy kids, like yours truly was once upon a time.

The X-Men may not have been the first comic I ever read, but it was the first that really spoke to me on a personal level, and Have been a fan ever since, through the good and the bad. (Image credit: Marvel Comics)Between his work on House of M and killing off Professor Xavier in AVX, Bends demonstrated his ability to weave a mutated story to keep readers' tongues wagging for years after it hit newsstands.

Although Hugh Jackman quips about the film franchise's black leather uniforms, most fans appreciated the visual contributions Quietly provided to bring the X-Men into the 21st Century while honoring their superhero nature. To that end, he's brought in creators like his 'X of Swords' co-architect Mini Howard, writers Leah Williams, Benjamin Percy, Gerry Duncan, Vita Ayala, and more as well as artists like Adam Hubert, Joshua Cassava, Lei nil You, Pepe Array, R.B.

(Image credit: Marvel Comics)Although Cock rum penciled less than 30 issues of Uncanny X-Men, his reboot of the dormant series alongside Len Wan was arguably one of the most important contributions to mutant kind. (Image credit: Marvel Comics)Following Cock rum's departure from the series, Byrne began his celebrated run on Uncanny X-Men alongside Chris Claremont penning what are still considered to be the greatest X-Men stories to date.

His work on the 'Dark Phoenix Saga' in particular is a touchstone for many artists and writers who step up into the role as a member of the creative team behind one of Marvel's premiere titles. Working with John Romina Sr. and Herb Tripe, Wan helped flesh out the pint-sized Canuck, who would go on to dominate comic books and silver screens the world round.

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(Image credit: Marvel Comics)A discussion about the most influential X-Men creators would be remiss if it did not factor in the very people who invented these genetically-enhanced superheroes: Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. Though Lee and Kirby's version dwindled, their core idea possessed the foundation for later creators to build upon, reviving the concept and turning the X-Men into enduring icons.

Most of Scott Lob dell stories center around the Gold team of the 90s, that's why he makes my list. Chris Claremont is one of X-Men most popular writers, and he wrote some good stories, and he introduces me to the X-Men.

Mike makes my list, because he wrote some good Rogue stories. Peter David makes my list, because he good writer, and he made me like characters such as Maddox and Monet.

Honorable Mentions: Ed Breaker, Mark Miller, Daniel Way, Larry Ham, Rob Ziegfeld, Brian Wood, Stan Lee and Brian K. Vaughan. I think it was his storyline at the very end of the original run that sparked Claremont interest.

My favorite writers in no particular order are: Chris Claremont, Joss When, Kyle most, Mike Carey, Rick Reminder, Ed Breaker, Peter David, Morrison, Stan Lee, Fabian Nicaea, Scott Lob dell Claremont is the backbone of the whole series and told some of the best stories, so he's first.

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Morrison had the second best run in my opinion, though planet x put a bit of a stain on the otherwise brilliant stories. Claremont is the backbone of the whole series and told some of the best stories, so he's first.

Morrison had the second best run in my opinion, though planet x put a bit of a stain on the otherwise brilliant stories. He's done more to create concepts and change the status quo then anyone in the last 10 years.

And arguably, despite a few slips execution, has actually succeeded with his stories being the most interesting. Though I think he'll be seen as a new Lob dell in terms of work, since we have to include him despite it not always being up to par.

Nicaea, When, Kyle and Most, Greg PAK is showing promise as an X-writer too. He gets good artists to make his shoddy stories look really Purdy so the oubliettes and tumbles can go gaga over the image sets, but that's about it.

Claremont Most Ellis Chuck Kim PAK Scott Gray Lob dell Reminder Ham Wood He gets good artists to make his shoddy stories look really Purdy so the oubliettes and tumbles can go gaga over the image sets, but that's about it.

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While I have no great love for his All-New X-Men, especially Both, I still think his Uncanny X-Men is one of if not the vestrymen books to come out in years. I get that both the style of the series and his writing in general are not to everyone's tastes, but to say he's done nothing with the X-men and doesn't understand them is just simply not true.

Despite probably writing more mediocre X-men comics than any other writer, he's still the king for his classic '80-'86 run. Besides stories like the Dark Phoenix Saga, Days of Future Past, and God Loves, Man Kills which basically redefined both the X-men and the genre, Claremont was really the first mainstream comic writer to pen female and POC characters as more than one dimensional archetypes or plot points, and really I don't think anyone has surpassed him for characterization in general.

In his original X-men run, his work on Excalibur, and his wonderful back-up stories in Classic X-Men, this was the guy who made the X-men great in the first place. If he'd stopped before he got to Planet X I might have even ranked him as #2, but for the year and a half that he turned the X-men into an awful self-parody he'll have to settle for #3.

The only reason I don't rank David higher is that he's never actually written X-men, but I feel like his work on various versions of X-Factor over the years have proved him to be one of the best writers to ever contribute to the X-men's characters and mythos. Despite not seeming to be able to write women, teenagers, or anyone who wasn't criminally insane realistically, Lee still wrote good stories with amazingly creative characters.

It's hard to compare him to any other writer, really, since he really established how all Marvel Comics were supposed to be written (which was for a much younger audience) until Claremont came along, but I still think he's one of the best. As I said above, While I have no great love for his All-New X-Men, especially Both, I still think his Uncanny X-Men is one of if not the vestrymen books to come out in years.

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Though he's not a writer that's written the most memorable or classic X-men stories, his character work and plots in the early 90s are still a large part of what I liked about the era. He did for Gambit and Locke what Lob dell did for Bishop and Jubilee; he made me like and care about characters I thought were stupid, and for that he gets a spot on the list.

Breaker makes it onto the list for being able to write like Claremont but with fewer words. Despite probably writing more mediocre X-men comics than any other writer, he's still the king for his classic '80-'86 run.

Despite probably writing more mediocre X-men comics than any other writer, he's still the king for his classic '80-'86 run. He gets good artists to make his shoddy stories look really Purdy so the oubliettes and tumbles can go gaga over the image sets, but that's about it.

While I have no great love for his All-New X-Men, especially Both, I still think his Uncanny X-Men is one of if not the vestrymen books to come out in years. I get that both the style of the series and his writing in general are not to everyone's tastes, but to say he's done nothing with the X-men and doesn't understand them is just simply not true.

But remember, the only reason for its long-lasting consequential implications is because of the editorial mandate behind its meager execution. Nevada/Axel wanted to rid of the booming mutant population that Morrison ingeniously ushered in, and he got around to doing just exactly that.

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@ageofhurricane said: HOM receives unsubstantiated positive recognition because it's the only event of its epoch that actually managed to deliver on the “And nothing will ever be the same” regurgitated slogan that Marvel's slapped on the subsequent events that've come after. But remember, the only reason for its long-lasting consequential implications is because of the editorial mandate behind its meager execution.

Be that as it may, critical acclaim isn't going to sway my opinion one way or the other; if I like a story, it's for its own merit. To my mind, my own positive recognition of the story is based wholly on my enjoyment of it.

It was a rare and perfect storm of a crossover series: it was essentially an X-men story, in the vein of DPS or Proteus, but also in an alternate reality like An Age Undreamed Of or AOA, but in a way that centered on mostly Avengers characters who are generally absent from the threats to reality that the X-men so often face. Nevada/Axel wanted to rid of the booming mutant population that Morrison ingeniously ushered in, and he got around to doing just exactly that.

I mean, NFL, I did thoroughly enjoy it, but not because of the interactions or pertinent themes relating the X-Men --but because of the dramatic narrative and consequence. I mean, I get that the story structure was pretty formulaic, but for me it's the character moments that really make it great.

To me, those are the real strengths of the story, and it's something that simply could not be pulled off by someone who didn't understand the characters, themes, and history on an intuitive level. @ageofhurricane said: HOM receives unsubstantiated positive recognition because it's the only event of its epoch that actually managed to deliver on the “And nothing will ever be the same” regurgitated slogan that Marvel's slapped on the subsequent events that've come after.

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But remember, the only reason for its long-lasting consequential implications is because of the editorial mandate behind its meager execution. Nevada/Axel wanted to rid of the booming mutant population that Morrison ingeniously ushered in, and he got around to doing just exactly that.

I'd say Morrison is the best storyteller, yet his ideas are the embodiment of everything I DON'T want to see and read about (besides the essential “change” between the lines). It's really depends on a story, Claremont, Lob dell, Gilles, Spurred, Carey, Breaker, Nicaea, PAD, even Fraction, Bends and Reminder have all told some good or great stories, but sadly no one remains up there for long.

I'd say Morrison is the best storyteller, yet his ideas are the embodiment of everything I DON'T want to see and read about (besides the essential “change” between the lines). Well, I loved his ideas in the first half; he came in and rejuvenated the X-men with an interesting new direction and a bunch of intriguing new characters, then he just seemed to give up and say all the X-men would ever be been Magneto, the Phoenix, and dystopian futures, all written pretty poorly.

I mean, I get that the story structure was pretty formulaic, but for me it's the character moments that really make it great. To me, those are the real strengths of the story, and it's something that simply could not be pulled off by someone who didn't understand the characters, themes, and history on an intuitive level.

Yeah, but any banal boob can have characters ostensibly freak the back out over a sudden change of setting. All it takes is a concise ingestion of their respective wiki bios and voilà, there you have it.

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And it's par for the course that people are freaking out with triple exclamation marks in a Bends comic--as in, it always happens. HOM was an editorial mandate so with preordained ending like that it'd look good from anyone's penmanship and Uncanny's been meandering on fluff for the past couple of issues.

His characters are devoid of palpable depth and his stories lack intrigue. I know people on this forum don't tend to appreciate his work on the X-men, but I've read an interview with him where his admitted his whole Uncanny vol.2 run was one big tie-in for then upcoming AVX.

Seeing what he achieved with just several issues of a book that was doomed at its premise makes me wonder, how groundbreaking his actual run could be. Once an idealist that ends laughing after murdering his father-like mentor, that orders to scar X's on faces, dam. That was the fucking culmination, the apogee, the crescendo of this long-awaited development.

I've said it before, and will say it again, Bends on the X-men is a disappointment for those who look for deep, uncommon or thought-provoking themes, but those who like typical “OMG it's Jean she's with us again! I'm kinda sure the Controversial-clops was editorially (it's like idiots and editors inoculation, Marvel's real life super-powers) c@ck-blocked, but I don't believe Bends has ever meant to take him that direction anyway.

I know people on this forum don't tend to appreciate his work on the X-men, but I've read an interview with him where his admitted his whole Uncanny vol.2 run was one big tie-in for then upcoming AVX. Seeing what he achieved with just several issues of a book that was doomed at its premise makes me wonder, how groundbreaking his actual run could be.

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Once idealist that ends laughing after murdering his father-like mentor, that orders to scar X's on faces, dam. That was the fucking culmination, the apogee, the crescendo of this long-awaited development. And I'm not even touching all the other little elaborations, like turning Colossus' repetitive and stagnant world upside down, or this incredible team that maybe for a short time, but took the X-men to another level.

I'm kinda sure the Controversial-clops was editorially (it's like idiots and editors inoculation, Marvel's real life super-powers) c@ck-blocked, but I don't believe Bends has ever meant to take him that direction anyway. Whilst I will openly confess that I found Gilles's run a complete snooze-fest after issue 1 (I mean, there were some good bits here and there but overall, I just wasn't a fan) I do very much appreciate the elevation of status and command that he instilled into the Extinction Team--had they have been given tenure till this very day I do believe they'd be an unequivocal force to be reckoned with.

And, yeah, I surprisingly found myself very much interested in Cyclops postal and following Gilles's Consequences arc I was eager to see where his story would lead. Anyhow, Bends comes along and all the sought after promise, in one fell swoop, is squandered in place of a false Revolution and antiquated tactics that set the X-Men back a couple of decades.

Yeah, but any banal boob can have characters ostensibly freak the back out over a sudden change of setting. All it takes is a concise ingestion of their respective wiki bios and voilà, there you have it.

And it's par for the course that people are freaking out with triple exclamation marks in a Bends comic--as in, it always happens. HOM was an editorial mandate so with preordained ending like that it'd look good from anyone's penmanship and Uncanny's been meandering on fluff for the past couple of issues.

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Some try to defend him and love his writing and that's fine, good for them because his fans are having a field day and getting what they want, so enjoy. I suspect that its mostly newbies that can't afford to go back and buy the high-priced original volumes and can't stand the old art and dialogue.

@oldnightcrawler : Heart-felt adoration for his work is your prerogative and that's all well and good for personal enjoyment, but to say he's one of the best X- Writers based on one event and two ham-fisted series is a bit of a stretch. The problem is, Only a few (actually 3, with maybe some other with their own style) writers wrote their own X-men, others pretty much just continued what was settled.

The uniqueness, the dialogs, the hidden twists that followed the WHOLE run and the final execution, it was just gherkin great, levels above most of the X-stories. Well, I loved his ideas in the first half; he came in and rejuvenated the X-men with an interesting new direction and a bunch of intriguing new characters, then he just seemed to give up and say all the X-men would ever be been Magneto, the Phoenix, and dystopian futures, all written pretty poorly.

@oldnightcrawler : Heart-felt adoration for his work is your prerogative and that's all well and good for personal enjoyment, but to say he's one of the best X- Writers based on one event and two ham-fisted series is a bit of a stretch. I never said I thought he was one of the bestX-menwriters, I said that I thought he was a good writer who's written some X-men stories that I liked; but you act as though the stories he's done have no merit whatsoever, that they're all just so objectively bad that anyone who likes them must have less discerning tastes and be more easily entertained than you, rendering whatever value they see in the work of less value than your own opinions.

:(I think Sinister egocentric-hive-race was the apex of his arrogance and narcissism, it was a great development! And Uncanny X-Men #4 convinced me this guy has his own style and a vision, which are essential for an X-writer.

I do very much appreciate the elevation of status and command that he instilled into the Extinction Team--had they have been given tenure till this very day I do believe they'd be an unequivocal force to be reckoned with. And, yeah, I surprisingly found myself very much interested in Cyclops postal and following Gilles's Consequences arc I was eager to see where his story would lead.

Anyhow, Bends comes along and all the sought after promise, in one fell swoop, is squandered in place of a false Revolution and antiquated tactics that set the X-Men back a couple of decades. To be honest, I think they figured status-quos work better than risky and controversial almost novelties.

Some try to defend him and love his writing and that's fine, good for them because his fans are having a field day and getting what they want, so enjoy. I suspect that its mostly newbies that can't afford to go back and buy the high-priced original volumes and can't stand the old art and dialogue.

It is actually a pretty complicated science, CIRC Gilles's run was terrible in sales, but for that I think we have to thank his predecessor Fraction lol Anyway, even Original Sin #0 sold pretty bad, I wonder how will the first issue deal, seems like only Spider-man and Deadpool sell good these days.

I'd just say the rest occupied a similar neutral area where the series continued, but nothing particularly new or innovative happened. Not an action book, but it includes great character development.

When done well I can enjoy a run of characters sitting around talking as much as strong action. Not an action book, but it includes great character development.

When done well I can enjoy a run of characters sitting around talking as much as strong action. Hardly ever do I see X-Fans overtly give the actual creators of the NAM as much praise as they do Kyle and Most, which is a bit annoying, but w.e.

Other writers that have only one fan : Mark Miller, Daniel Way, Rob Ziegfeld, Roy Thomas, Ellis Warren, Chuck Kim, Scott Gray, Keaton Gillian, Matt Fraction, Peter Milligan, Nun Defilippis, Christina Weir & Brian K. Vaughan. @westfriesianman I think you can include writers like Peter David and Rick Reminder, because they have written for X-Men characters.

1) Morrison(the best, he introduced Emma into the mainstream Marvel Comics and I loved the strange stories he wrote, he got the X-Men into modernity); He's a bit cinematographic in the way he writes or organizes the plot, and I love this.

He was also able to give a unique voice to characters such as Kitty, Emma or Abigail Brand); I slowly fell in love with each of the characters he wrote, and he's kept creating new ways to look at mutants, from the investigation team to the private corporation, his runs have always been great.

5) Reminder(best X-Force run, best version of Locke I've ever read, complex plot with great introspection, this was the best title a writer could have written about a team of mutant killers. 7) Bends(may we like it or not, he's reestablished the X-Men fame which had been fading over the last years.

It's perfect) and Gilles(without AVX he would have built a great X-Men run, it's a shame that it got ruined because of the event IMO). I considered knocking one of the Wolverine writers off my top 10 in favor of Christopher Most/Craig Kyle, Scott Lob dell, Fabian Nicaea, Warren Ellis (Excalibur), or Brian Michael Bends (for his Ultimate X-Men run, I haven't gotten to his current X-Men run, though I'm looking forward to it), but I just couldn't do it.

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Sources
1 www.imdb.com - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1156398/
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3 en.wikipedia.org - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zombieland:_Double_Tap