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Can Surgeons Listen To Music While Operating

author
Danielle Fletcher
• Wednesday, 20 January, 2021
• 8 min read

Roughly 80 percent of operating room staff say that music benefits cooperation between team members, reduces anxiety levels and improves efficiency. In the early 1900s, Pennsylvania surgeon Evan Kane came out as a proponent of the “phonograph in the operating room,” which provided a means of “calming and distracting the patient from the horror of the situation,” according to the BMJ report.

(Source: mas.txt-nifty.com)

Contents

While some medical experts argue that music might be distracting and hinder communication in the operating room, the Wales surgeons maintain that if noise levels are controlled, the benefits may outweigh the risks. This study and other research suggests that this positive effect may be maintained after surgery, the Wales surgeons note.

A growing body of research has also suggested that music's healing properties extend to pain relief. Research conducted in Singapore also found that palliative care patients who participated in live music therapy reported relief from persistent pain.

See Gallery healthy living surgery Surgeons British Medical Journal The essential guide to taking care of your mind and body A new study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston shows that when plastic surgeons listen to music they prefer, their surgical technique and efficiency when closing incisions is improved.

From classical to rock, musician be heard in operating rooms across the world. Although previous studies have shown that listening to music during operations can lower the stress levels of surgeons, there is limited information on the effects of music on technical performance while completing a surgical task, such as closing incisions.

Fifteen plastic surgery residents were asked to close incisions with layered stitches on pigs' feet obtained at a local food market -- pigs' feet are widely accepted as similar to human skin. The day after the first incision closing exercise, the residents were asked to do another repair using identical technique with the music either being turned on or off, in opposition to the first closure.

They were not told that the researchers were comparing times or that the results would be graded until the study was completed. “We recognized that our subjects could potentially improve on the second repair simply as the result of repetition,” said author Dr. Shelby Lies, the TMB chief plastic surgery resident.

The average repair completion time for all residents was 7 percent shorter when their preferred music was playing. Playing their preferred music led to a 10 percent reduction of repair time for senior residents as compared to an 8 percent time reduction seen in the junior residents.

“Our study confirmed that listening to the surgeon's preferred music improves efficiency and quality of wound closure, which may translate to health care cost savings and better patient outcomes,” said author Dr. Andrew Zhang, TMB assistant professor of surgery in the division of plastic and reconstructive surgery. Prospective Randomized Study of the Effect of Music on the Efficiency of Surgical Closures.

A new study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston shows that when plastic surgeons listen to music they prefer, their surgical technique and efficiency when closing incisions is improved. The day after the first incision closing exercise, the residents were asked to do another repair using identical technique with the music either being turned on or off, in opposition to the first closure.

“We recognized that our subjects could potentially improve on the second repair simply as the result of repetition,” said author Dr. Shelby Lies, the TMB chief plastic surgery resident. The average repair completion time for all residents was 7 percent shorter when their preferred music was playing.

“Spending less time in the operating room can translate into significant cost reductions, particularly when incision closure is a large portion of the procedure, such as in a tummy tuck,” said Lies. “Our study confirmed that listening to the surgeon’s preferred music improves efficiency and quality of wound closure, which may translate to health care cost savings and better patient outcomes,” said author Dr. Andrew Zhang, TMB assistant professor of surgery in the division of plastic and reconstructive surgery.

He ties on his mask, studies images of his patient’s brain and, just as crucially, sets his playlist. Like a rock band crafting a concert set, the neurosurgeon at Toronto’s St. Michael’s Hospital has carefully chosen today’s music to suit the surgery.

It’s an awake craniectomy, a tricky procedure that Was, 43, undertakes while the patient is primarily asleep, but at times aware, to extract a tumor from deep within the brain. While nurses ready the sterile space, the cheery strains of a piano sonata mingle with the clink of surgical instruments.

Soon, the sonata gives way to a George Gershwin tune, followed by Brazilian jazz and early Leonard Cohen. Then the whir of a surgical saw slicing into the patient’s skull momentarily drowns out music streaming from Was’ nearby iPhone and small speaker.

More than just background noise, music sets the mood and focuses their concentration, becoming a crucial part of a surgeon’s surgical routine. Dr. Ike Ahmed, head of ophthalmology at Trillium Health Partners in Mississauga, loves his custom-built operating room with its subwoofer speaker system.

For Ahmed, music helps pass the time during back-to-back procedures and unifies his team of nurses, surgeons and anesthesiologists who, no matter their age or background, can usually hum along to Pink Floyd. An expert in surgically treating cataracts and glaucoma, Ahmed also uses classic rock as an adrenalin boost before making incisions, some just fractions of a millimeter deep, into a patient’s eye.

On his drive into work, he’ll often sing “Where the Streets Have No Name,” matching Bono’s passionate crescendos. “It’s like an athlete listening to music in the locker room before heading out onto the field; it gets me psyched up.

Before the widespread use of anesthesia 150 years ago, a patient’s screams would surely have drowned out any peaceful melody. But by the early 1900s, after anesthesia and antisepsis made survival more routine, some surgeons looked for ways to make surgeries less frightening.

Earlier this year, Spotify and the medical app Figure 1 surveyed 700 surgeons about their music habits and found 90 per cent have surgical playlists, many dominated by pop and classic rock. In Toronto, that usually means no country music, no opera, not too much heavy metal and no songs that hint at death.

Jessica Grain, a neuroscientist at Western University, studies the relationship between music and the brain and says people in good moods perform better on all sorts of cognitive tests. But for surgeons, who are executing this well-practised maneuver over and over, staying vigilant is crucial and music would absolutely help.

Not long ago, one of his patients, a young mother of three, asked to listen to The Tragically Hip during the awake portion of her craniectomy. She believed Good Donnie singing about Bobcaygeon could help ease her terror.

Dr. Dean Alderman, urologist at Toronto Western Hospital, a part of University Health Network I do have some Merle Haggard and Johnny Cash on my playlist, but my taste in country doesn’t sway beyond that.

There’s not a lot of death metal, though I do have colleagues who find a way to get it into the operating room.” Why he plays music : “If you think about what surgery requires, it often demands attention and constant decision-making in a setting that is often stressful and heavy with the weight of what it involves and the consequences of what those decisions are.

I think there is a way that music allows me to escape some weight of that emotion and stay within the moment of surgery itself.” It can be country, classical or whatever the kids listen to these days; Dr. Doug Katz just needs a tune playing in the background while he works.

The pediatric general surgeon at Memoirs/A.I. DuPont Hospital for Children almost always plays music during his surgeries, which can last for several hours. Katz is one of many area surgeons who said music in the operating room plays a larger role than most people might realize.

Like any office, “water cooler talk” is a normal occurrence in the OR: Think “Game of Thrones” recaps, sports chatter and, yes, political debates. Listening to musician improve surgeons technique, according to a 2015 study published in The Aesthetic Surgery Journal.

Researchers asked plastic surgeons to close wounds on pigs' feet, which is similar to human skin, on two consecutive days. Researchers found that the average completion time was 7 to 10 percent faster when the doctors listened to music.

Early in his career as a pediatric orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Alfred Amanda’s had a big Dave Matthews Band phase. If it’s a shorter procedure, about an hour long, he’ll play something upbeat, like pop, techno or '90s hip-hop.

He’s found listening to music he and others in the OR grew up with creates a comfortable ambiance and atmosphere. The type of music (or lack thereof) serves as a barometer for how well things are going in the room, Amanda said.

The selection of the music is part of Shah’s “surgical timeout,” or a meeting about the procedure before the first incision is made. The group, standing in a huddle, introduces themselves, discusses the patient and procedure, and addresses concerns from anyone on the surgical team.

Most medical errors made in surgeries are avoidable but often occur because someone didn’t feel comfortable speaking up, he said.

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4 play.google.com - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details
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