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Can You Get X Ray Results Right Away

author
James Smith
• Sunday, 15 November, 2020
• 11 min read

The time it takes, however depends on how busy the radiology department is at the moment and the complexity of the findings. Just call on Friday to see if they’re available, if they are and the receptionist can ’t give details, ask to arrange a telephone consultation with one of the GP's.

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Contents

In this case the radiologist most of the time knows the suspect ion and will be around when shoots are taken, otherwise he will come see them straight away if the labor ants notices something unusual (as labor ants (but also radiologists) are never allowed to tell anything about the pictures taken to the patient involved), and after judging the radiologist will contact the doctor, and then it depends on the doctor how soon he will tell. Fractures are always told straight away as medical staff in this case are allowed to give diagnosis to proceed the treatment, cancer only after further research to make the right diagnosis because most times rays, ct or MRI aren't telling what kind of cancer is shown.

It is not true to think that you will hear faster when it is something worse, it only goes for fractures and lung diseases for example, that need immediate treatment that can't wait for more than one day. I have found in the past that when it's worrying you (the patient) it's best to call the doctor's office to ask about it.

Sometimes what a doctor feels is important isn't necessarily on the same page as the patient's concern. Your ray is most likely a non-urgent matter, you doctor knows it, but he fails to realize the anxiety level of the patient.

Your father does no longer want a cardiac path (or angiogram) until eventually a workout rigidity try shows he has heart ailment (or until eventually he has a sparkling decrease angina attack interior the meanwhile). Meanwhile, he desires to work out and make his weight relief plan a touch leaner.

All docs are different.... some may call you right away and others might figure “what's a few more days”........ depends on how busy they are As we work through these challenging times, Think is taking actions to protect the health and safety of our patients and employees.

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Our physicians and all healthcare workers continue to exercise precautions for infection control. All hard surfaces are being cleaned between each patient, and every individual that comes into the Think building is screened for viral illness including cold, flu, and COVID-19.

If there is a concern for a viral infection, individuals are placed in dedicated rooms away from the rest of the patients. Telemedicine Services Think is able to provide Telehealth appointments with your medical team on a Smartphone or computer.

If you are unable to come in to the Think building, and do not have a Smartphone, a telephone call can be scheduled with your care team. If you are younger than 65 without chronic disease and have a fever, cough, or sore throat, the first line of treatment is rest, fluids, and Acetaminophen (such as Tylenol) as needed.

If a caregiver feels that you need to be seen, we will ask you to give us your cell phone number, so we have the most direct way to contact you in the parking lot and while in the building. When you arrive at Think, someone wearing protective gear will meet you in the parking lot, apply a mask to you, and escort you to an isolation room which are thoroughly sanitized between patients.

To make this more convenient, your pharmacy team can synchronize your medications, so they can be filled and received at the same time. Our pharmacists are happy to review your insurance benefits to ensure you get them at the best price.

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Update:The Radiologist told me to contact my doctor in 2 weeks for the results, and my lungs hurt :-( That sounds like a load of crap, I have lung problems and the longest I've ever waited was an hour.

They shouldn't tell you that it's going to be 2 weeks because the reality is even if there busy the longest it would be is about 3 hours. I'd go to where the ray was done and ask for the rays (because there about you, you have every right to view them) and then maybe ring your doctor and ask if they have any cancellations, if they don't then ask if you could see your doctor just before there lunch break just to view them and put your mind at ease.

In a big hospital situation there might be 4 technicians “feeding” one specialist doctor. He sees and analyses the routine rays when he has time in between the emergency ones.

In a small private practice you can get the result while you wait, but it costs heaps more. If your doctor sent you to confirm, or see the extent, of a disease already suspected or diagnosed, there's less hurry.

Sign in It is because they have to find medical staff to interpret the results (which requires specialist training) and there is always a backlog as so many x-rays are taken. Medical conditions like lungs, liver and spleen usually take a back seat whereas bone breaks take priority, especially in cases where surgery is required to rectify breakages.

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Your condition is obviously not life-threatening and so takes a lower priority in the bigger picture, to say, someone with a femur break/fracture... The radiologist has to interpret the exam, then it has to be dictated and typed by a medical transcriptionist and then sent to your doctor.

Well I just rang my GP surgery and asked receptionist if my results were back. I'm thinking it couldn't be urgent otherwise she'd have told me to ring later today.

Depends on:Most facilities around the world strive to have results within 24 hrs, but often this goal is not met. If you push, younger the results sooner.

Any info from the technician would be a HIPAA violation. If they can 't suggest a cure/treatment they shouldn't offer a diagnosis. The radiologist reading the images is a specialist.

Toucan request a copy of the images for yourself.Also, I had a doctor NOT see a fracture in a rib, but the experienced radiologist DID SEE IT! In the U.S., the common practice is that your doctor orders a radiology test (ultrasound, CT, MRI...), and you go to the place (often different location than your doctor's office) to have the test.

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Then the technician comes back to tell you to wait for your doctor to tell you the result. My first question: Why don't they send the images to your doctor, but only the written report? That means the doctor at the radiology lab is making the diagnosis, and your doctor simply take what ever they wrote, without seeing the actual images.

Also, I would guess the technician herself must have enough knowledge to know more or less what you have upon scanning you (say whether a mass/lump is a cyst or tumor)? Mr. CSD has had numerous rays and MRI's over the last few months, and we have left the office with a CD of those test every time, so I'm not sure what your issue is.

There is also no sense in telling someone “don't worry” when it comes to medical tests and results, people are human, they worry and the waiting for the test results is the hardest part of the test. In the U.S., the common practice is that your doctor orders a radiology test (ultrasound, CT, MRI...), and you go to the place (often different location than your doctor's office) to have the test.

Then the technician comes back to tell you to wait for your doctor to tell you the result. My first question: Why don't they send the images to your doctor, but only the written report? That means the doctor at the radiology lab is making the diagnosis, and your doctor simply take what ever they wrote, without seeing the actual images.

Also, I would guess the technician herself must have enough knowledge to know more or less what you have upon scanning you (say whether a mass/lump is a cyst or tumor)? The radiologist interprets the images because that's what they do...they have the training and expertise that the typical ordering practitioner does not have.

That being said almost medical imaging is digitized on a PACS system or similar and any ordering practitioner can easily access the images in addition to the report if they so desire. Much of medicine is compartmentalized in this manner, and it is to the patient's benefit.

Let's say something is found on an MRI and you undergo surgery, a biopsy...do you want the surgeon looking under the microscope at the tissue to make a diagnosis or a Pathologist who has been trained exclusively in that discipline and looks at tissue under the microscope all day every day to make a diagnosis. It isn't their job, and they aren't trained to interpret the images they obtain.

Everyone wants to be reassured but unfortunately not all results ARE reassuring and many times bad news must be given, that should come from your doc, not a CT, MRI,Ammo tech... If they can 't suggest a cure/treatment they shouldn't offer a diagnosis. The radiologist reading the images is a specialist.

Actually...it's primarily about Health Insurance Portability (the HIP part) but also has additional requirements related to protected health information. In short, it protects a patient from having their PHI released to unauthorized parties without their knowledge and consent.

The patient is not an unauthorized party as it's their PHI. As far as HIPAA related fines...it's certainly possible but the release of PHI would have to proven to be significant and willful. There would be an issue with the technician operating outside their scope of practice (as defined by the state that issues their license) and that can be serious for the patient and the technician.

Knowing how to shoot a film is a long way from being a skilled diagnostician. From the tech's perspective there are two issues: 1. They are practicing outside their scope and risk losing their license.

Moreover, depending on the specialty of the referring physician, the interpretation of a Radiologist may not even be important. Orthopedic surgeons, for example, care little about the Radiologist's report, because they are more proficient at reading the images themselves.

Completely out of their scope of practice and a huge liability for all parties involved. Let's say something is found on an MRI and you undergo surgery, a biopsy...do you want the surgeon looking under the microscope at the tissue to make a diagnosis or a Pathologist who has been trained exclusively in that discipline and looks at tissue under the microscope all day every day to make a diagnosis.

That's a good point... I had surgery a year ago and when I woke up, the surgeon told me that most of the tissue she saw in the scope and removed was cancerous, that she would let me know what the lab said about it but that in her opinion tissue that looked like that always turned out to be cancer. And when the lab report came back, there was no cancer at all and no hyperplasia in the tissue that was removed.

Second, it is better for the doctor to give the results with explanation and third sometimes it takes a second look to be sure of what is seen. I know it is horrible waiting for results, but it is better to hear it (good of bad) from a doctor.

I will add, thought the tech can 't tell us anything, sometimes they do let something slip, like you are going to be ok or something like that. Some physicians will want to see the images (most of the orthopedists I work with insist on seeing the images themselves), whereas many others will be glad to defer to the radiologist's opinion.

You want the most knowledgeable and experienced eyes looking at your image. Having said that, experienced techs often do know what they are looking at, especially if it's something pretty common.

For example, I was sent for a mammogram and then ultrasound after my ob/gun found a lump in my breast. It turned out I had a very large tumor, and the most common type of breast cancer.

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