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Dear Zoo Story Ordering

author
Maria Johnson
• Sunday, 17 October, 2021
• 9 min read

Windows Phone Original review, August 19, 2015Huh, I somehow missed this excellent very-easy-reader when I was kid and only just encountered it as my baby niece had it.

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Contents

She handed it to me in exchange for my Michelin Must Sees Milan & Italian Lakes guide, which apparently I am not getting back. 5 months later this is still a firm favorite with my niece, who wanted it read three times before bed.

Original review, August 19, 2015Huh, I somehow missed this excellent very-easy-reader when I was kid and only just encountered it as my baby niece had it. She handed it to me in exchange for my Michelin Must Sees Milan & Italian Lakes guide, which apparently I am not getting back.

5 months later this is still a firm favorite with my niece, who wanted it read three times before bed. The flaps have held up quite well, and the book about Italian lakes is also undamaged (it's still on the shelf with Sandra Boston and Me Fox.

Another favorite from my childhood. A nice interaction tale with various flaps as parents are able to teach children the different animals that can be found at the zoo. Hours of fun! “ Dairies was written as a lift-the-flap board book in 1982, by the Scottish author, Rod Campbell.

It is his most famous work, and thirty-five years later, it is still tremendously popular among the under fives in Great Britain, and has been translated into more than a dozen different languages. This review is for Dairies: Noisy Book, which I think is the best of all the many versions and formats. “ Dairies was written as a lift-the-flap board book in 1982, by the Scottish author, Rod Campbell.

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It is his most famous work, and thirty-five years later, it is still tremendously popular among the under fives in Great Britain, and has been translated into more than a dozen different languages. This review is for Dairies: Noisy Book, which I think is the best of all the many versions and formats. And just as in the original book, the opposite page shows a mysterious “something”, hidden in a crate.

And I can assure you (because I’ve done this myself) that if you accidentally sit on it, you will find that it might trumpet at you, or chatter like a monkey, or even (and this is a bit scary if you’re not expecting it!) A simple instruction to press the button is underneath the main text each time.

The ladder of buttons is set into a raised platform down the right-hand side of the book. It stands proud throughout the read as the pages are turned, and lies flush with the padded cover when the book is closed.

The lion was too fierce, the camel too grumpy, the snake too scary, the monkey too naughty, the frog too jumpy … Each time the reason for returning the animal is different, and the words of the instruction are also slightly different (e.g. The buttons are not in the same order as the pictures in the book either, so the child has to think, and look carefully to choose the right one.

As a child he lived in Zimbabwe, before returning to Britain to complete his education (taking his doctorate in organic chemistry). This led him to think about explorers many years ago, who would send animals to zoos in crates, and this sparked his light-bulb moment.

(Of course some children may need to be told that animals are not delivered like this nowadays, nor by the postman in the ordinary mail!) For the very youngest children, Dairies : Animal Shapes” is a sturdy board book.

It includes the fun element of flaps, teaches both the names of the animals and how to identify them. It invites questions such as: “How big is the crate?” and “What sort of animal might fit inside there?” It uses language with simple repetition, but also creatively.

It's much more fun when you're “reading” this with babies and toddlers and using something fun, furry and soft. When I “read” it, I had a box marked “From the Zoo (as if the kids could read it) and I would just say the same line over and over again:”I wrote to the zoo to send me a pet...” (That's a direct quote from the book) and then I'd pull out a different puppet from the box and bring it to life borrowed the words from this book and set the book aside for parents to look at and/or check out. It's much more fun when you're “reading” this with babies and toddlers and using something fun, furry and soft. When I “read” it, I had a box marked “From the Zoo (as if the kids could read it) and I would just say the same line over and over again:”I wrote to the zoo to send me a pet...” (That's a direct quote from the book) and then I'd pull out a different puppet from the box and bring it to life for a few seconds.

She collected a bunch of small boxes and made them look they came in the mail, then she put animal finger puppets inside. Ok, I'm one of those smug animal lovers who have naff, self-righteous car stickers.

Ok, I'm one of those smug animal lovers who have naff, self-righteous car stickers. And I couldn't say no to the animal charity where I got my dog from, when they asked me to stick it on my rear screen window.). Regardless.

Am I delivering a dark, subconscious message of irresponsibility to my child when I read her this? And my husband told me to lighten up, get off my high horse and “it's only a kids' book.

The nature of repetitiveness enables young readers to predict and engage with the story. The story is written as a letter to a zoo asking them to send a pet to the reader.

The nature of repetitiveness enables young readers to predict and engage with the story. The story is written as a letter to a zoo asking them to send a pet to the reader.

At the end of each page there is a simple reason why the animal was not kept and the sentence, ‘I sent him back’. This story is probably best suited for young children and can be used individually or in a small group or whole class reading.

The book ‘ Dairies by Rod Campbell was a favorite amongst the children at my nursery. It’s a story about a child who writes to the zoo asking for a pet, and receives a number of unsuitable animals from them.

The children at my nursery really loved the interactive ‘lift the flap’ element and would ask for this book to be read to them again and again. It’s a story about a child who writes to the zoo asking for a pet, and receives a number of unsuitable animals from them.

The children at my nursery really loved the interactive ‘lift the flap’ element and would ask for this book to be read to them again and again. It was a great way to build children’s knowledge and understanding of the world, by making links with animals, their names and their characteristics.

After seeing firsthand how well children engage with this book, I would have to recommend it to anyone teaching the EYES. Children can guess what animals they think will be behind the flap and explain why, which encourages verbal reasoning.

The book provides ample opportunity for discussion the children can talk about what animal they would like as a pet. Children can guess what animals they think will be behind the flap and explain why, which encourages verbal reasoning.

The book provides ample opportunity for discussion the children can talk about what animal they would like as a pet. With slightly older children they can think about how it would feel to be a cage/box etc this can be done through role-play and discussion.

And the lack of specificity in the kid’s request leads to the zoo wasting what I can only imagine is an astronomical amount of money on postage. It captures perfectly what occurs in any family whenever a kid decides that they want a pet.

The flaps are also great for little hands as they discover the surprises beneath. There is a reason this book has been in print for some 25 years and counting. It captures perfectly what occurs in any family whenever a kid decides that they want a pet.

Cute little book and my children love opening the flaps and shouting out the animal names. As he hasn't ruled out one day becoming a zookeeper, Ben found the premise of this book intriguing; a kid writes a letter to the zoo and gets free stuff.

Who's responsible for the return postage? His eyes kind of wandered away from the story which I could take to mean he was ready for his morning nap or that he would have liked another page for each animal showing how they were too fierce or too scary. Ben ended up being pretty happy with the story, and thought the zoo totally nailed it with the last animal they sent.

A sadistic zookeeper attempts murder by luring a small child into close contact with a lion and a snake. A sadistic zookeeper attempts murder by luring a small child into close contact with a lion and a snake. I read this to my toddler at least six times a day, so I think it should count toward my challenge goal.

Well then Mary tried to read it herself and made the lion a and I had to explain that because the lion has a mane, that means it’s male, but since no other animal in the book has any physicaFour stars instead of 5 because all the animals are “he,” so I change half of them to “she” when I read it to the girls, and the first time I did that Mary (4 yo.) This one is really cute and the flaps seem really secure, so my toddler won’t rip them apart so easily.

You'd spend hours as an adult picking up the flaps to reveal the animal underneath, folded and cut in such a way that you get this delightful pop up that is pretty much wow. Kai obviously has slightly more discerning taste that I do and is not taken by frills and whistles (i.e., the pop up animals).

Here's an example (off the top my head, because I've The writing is pretty crappy in this book, but the pop-ups are fabulous! You'd spend hours as an adult picking up the flaps to reveal the animal underneath, folded and cut in such a way that you get this delightful pop up that is pretty much wow.

Kai obviously has slightly more discerning taste that I do and is not taken by frills and whistles (i.e., the pop up animals). Here's an example (off the top my head, because I've read this book a lot): “I wrote to zoo to send me a pet.

This is a super cute children's book that has flaps to reveal different animals the zoo sent to the writer. This is a super cute children's book that has flaps to reveal different animals the zoo sent to the writer.

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Sources
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2 www.closerweekly.com - https://www.closerweekly.com/posts/pat-sajak-net-worth-wheel-of-fortune-hosts-salary-revealed/
3 www.celebritynetworth.com - https://www.celebritynetworth.com/articles/celebrity/much-wheel-fortune-host-pat-sajak-make/
4 hollywoodmask.com - https://hollywoodmask.com/entertainment/vanna-white-wheel-fortune-salary-net-worth.html
5 ca.style.yahoo.com - https://ca.style.yahoo.com/whole-story-behind-vanna-white-133000399.html